Tag Archives: Emily Dickinson

Women’s History Month

Women’s History Month is a celebration of women’s contributions to history, culture and society and has been observed annually in the month of March in the United States since 1987. Women’s History Month 2024 will take place from Friday, March 1 – Sunday, March 31, 2024.

The U.S. and other countries, including the U.K. and Australia, are celebrating Women’s History Month in March, featuring International Women’s Day on March 8.

International Women’s Day (IWD) is a holiday celebrated annually on March 8 as a focal point in the women’s rights movement. IWD gives focus to issues such as gender equality, reproductive rights, and violence and abuse against women. Spurred by the universal female suffrage movement, IWD originated from labor movements in North America and Europe during the early 20th century.

The earliest version reported was a “Women’s Day” organized by the Socialist Party of America in New York City on February 28, 1909. This inspired German delegates at the 1910 International Socialist Women’s Conference to propose “a special Women’s Day” be organized annually, albeit with no set date;[8] the following year saw the first demonstrations and commemorations of International Women’s Day across Europe. After the Russian Revolution in 1917, IWD was made a national holiday on March 8; it was subsequently celebrated on that date by the socialist movement and communist countries. The holiday became a mainstream global holiday following its promotion by the United Nations in 1977.

Women’s History Month started as a local week.
Women’s History Month began as a local week-long celebration in Santa Rosa, California in 1978, according to the online National Women’s History Museum. The Education Task Force of the Sonoma County Commission on the Status of Women planned the week and timed it with International Women’s Day.

There is an annual theme for Women’s History Month
The National Women’s History Alliance sets a theme for the month every year. This year’s theme is “Women Who Advocate for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion.”

“Women are like teabags. We don’t know our true strength until we are in hot water.” – Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962), political figure, diplomat, activist, First Lady.

“The most difficult thing is the decision to act, the rest is merely tenacity,” – Amelia Earhart (1897-1937?), aviation pioneer.

“You must never be fearful about what you are doing when it is right.” – Rosa Parks (1913-2005), civil rights activist.

“Courage is the most important of all the virtues because without courage, you can’t practice any other virtue consistently.” ― Maya Angelou, (1928-2014), memoirist, poet, civil rights activist.

“I know nothing in the world that has as much power as a word. Sometimes I write one, and I look at it, until it begins to shine.” ― Emily Dickinson

“I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand. It’s when you know you’re licked before you begin, but you begin anyway and see it through no matter what.” ― Harper Lee

AI generated picture

What friends?

I have the sun
and the full moons,
The air and the water
blue.

The memories of
the sweet hills
and the crescent moon
keeping the vineyards
in bloom.

For my love
I would give
My hills
wrapped in balmy
vine flowers.

“If I can stop a heart from breaking, I shall not live in vain”. – Emily Dickinson

© Iulia Halatz

Art – Jo March (British, b.1962)

Poetry featured at Medium/Blue Insights publication.

Wild nights – Wild nights!

Wild nights – Wild nights!
BY EMILY DICKINSON

Wild nights – Wild nights!
Were I with thee
Wild nights should be
Our luxury!

Futile – the winds –
To a Heart in port –
Done with the Compass –
Done with the Chart!

Rowing in Eden –
Ah – the Sea!
Might I but moor – tonight –
In thee!

Happy 190th anniversary, Emily Dickinson!

Which poem reminds you of your childhood?

Which poem reminds you of your childhood? Either because you read it as a child or because when you read it, it resonates with your inner child.

A Bird, came down the Walk
by EMILY DICKINSON

A Bird, came down the Walk –
He did not know I saw –
He bit an Angle Worm in halves
And ate the fellow, raw,

And then, he drank a Dew
From a convenient Grass –
And then hopped sidewise to the Wall
To let a Beetle pass –

He glanced with rapid eyes,
That hurried all abroad –
They looked like frightened Beads, I thought,
He stirred his Velvet Head. –

Like one in danger, Cautious,
I offered him a Crumb,
And he unrolled his feathers,
And rowed him softer Home –

Than Oars divide the Ocean,
Too silver for a seam,
Or Butterflies, off Banks of Noon,
Leap, plashless as they swim.

Answer featured at Quora.com.

Art – Charles van Sandwyk.

I dwell in Possibility

I dwell in Possibility
By EMILY DICKINSON

I dwell in Possibility –
A fairer House than Prose –
More numerous of Windows –
Superior – for Doors –

Of Chambers as the Cedars –
Impregnable of eye –
And for an everlasting Roof
The Gambrels of the Sky –

Of Visitors – the fairest –
For Occupation – This –
The spreading wide my narrow Hands
To gather Paradise –

Art – Charles Courtney Curran